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by Floyd Rumohr

Employee Performance Reviews Image #2Performance reviews are a challenge for most nonprofit leaders and managers. Traditional approaches such as skills-based competency evaluations can be time-consuming and not particularly effective according to some compelling research from the for-profit sector.

Jena McGregor of The Washington Post has been writing some interesting pieces about for-profit leadership in general and human resources in particular. One of her most recent is based on a Harvard Business Review report about 360-degree and laborious, once-a-year evaluations. The HBR reported that Deloitte has simplified the process for 10 per cent of its workforce using the following four statements:

  1. Given what I know of this person’s performance, and if it were my money, I would award this person the highest possible compensation increase and bonus.
  2. Given what I know of this person’s performance, I would always want him or her on my team.
  3. This person is at risk for low performance.
  4. This person is ready for promotion today.

Deloitte uses a 1-5 rating scale for the first two statements and a simple “yes” or “no” response for the last two. Managers respond to the above four points at the end of every project or at the end of every quarter for longer term activities. Time will tell if this will take off at other companies, and what implications, if any, the framework has for nonprofits.

Here’s what I like about it:

  1. It saves time and could encourage more frequent, formative touch points with direct reports.
  2. It captures low-performance risk and could trigger a deeper dive into professional development needs.
  3. Employee performance is reviewed in the context of organizational/programmatic goals.
  4. The statements are deceptively simple. Just like the Charting Impact framework for organizations developed by BBB Wise Giving Alliance, GuideStar USA and Independent Sector, the statements will encourage discussion and inquiry regardless of where a particular employee falls on the scale.

Here’s what I don’t like:

  1. The emphasis on extrinsic rewards like bonuses and compensation. Nonprofit team members might be motivated by other factors like mission or culture and not respond to incentives used successfully in for-profit contexts.
  2. The majority of nonprofits have limited upward mobility options because of their size. Statement #4 could mean that the only way “up” is out.

What do you think? How does your organization conduct performance reviews? What role does the process play in achieving your mission? If a skill learned today could be obsolete tomorrow, then what should the basis be for employee performance at your nonprofit?

Get the Employee Assessment Instrument in the Rumohr and Clarke Video and Template Library. Click here and select title 5.1. Although Deloitte uses a 1-5 scale from “Strongly Agree” to “Strongly Disagree,” we recommend a 1-4 scale to discourage responders from gravitating toward the middle.

 

References and recommended reading:

— “What if you could replace performance evaluations with four simple questions?” by Jena McGregor, The Washington Post, March 17, 2015: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/on-leadership/wp/2015/03/17/deloitte-ditches-performance-rankings-and-instead-will-ask-four-simple-questions/.

— “Reinventing Performance Management” by Marcus Buckingham and Ashley Goodall, Harvard Business Review, April 2015. Accessed online March 17, 2015: https://hbr.org/2015/04/reinventing-performance-management.

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By Jenny Clarke. Reposted from the NYC Arts in Education Roundtable blog, December 11, 2014

When the CulturCDP 2al Data Project (CDP) reporting process was rolled out some years ago, it seemed a great idea – arts organizations could complete one comprehensive online report that would work for a slew of grant makers. It didn’t take long for reality to set in. We would in fact be digging really deeply into all aspects of our organization to conduct a comprehensive survey AND the rest of the reporting work didn’t seem to go away. Then there were the scary e-mails from CDP outlining all the errors in our reports and worse than that were phone calls from extremely perky and helpful CDP staffers asking about the intricacies of long-forgotten calculations.

But CDP has been working diligently to turn what was perceived as a burden into a valuable resource. Becoming an independent organization a year ago, CDP is reinforcing its goal to be a “powerful online management tool designed to strengthen arts and cultural organizations.”

New tools have made the online system easier to use and expanded educational offerings help the field use data more effectively to tell the organization’s story.  In addition, CDP is now the holder of a vast collection of original data from the field, which is available for cultural research projects (by application).

CDP is promising more great things ahead, while “building critical information resources and skills that will advance the sector in the future.”  The field will eventually find that what was once a burdensome drain will actually help us tell our stories to funders, audiences, and stake-holders, and will enrich the field. And in any case, those of us who are in New York State now have Grants Gateway to deal with. One day, perhaps, we will appreciate having all our documents in an online vault and realize that it’s good for the sector.

 

By Jenny Clarke

Reposted from the NYC Arts in Education Roundtable blog, November 1, 2014

This morning, I was looking at images of last night’s Halloween parade in the Village, marveling at the creativity of costumes, puppets, banners, and art on display. It seems as if Halloween brings out our passion for creating an altered persona and world, weaving together creative imagination and a variety of repurposed materials.

These images led me to thinking about the greatest NYC resource in our field for repurposed materials of every conceivable kind, and that is Materials for the Arts (MFTA). If your organization is not registered and you haven’t engaged in MFTA programs or visited the warehouse in Queens, a review of programs and services is highly recommended.

The MThe-warehouseFTA warehouse is operated by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs with additional support from the City’s Departments of Sanitation and of Education. MFTA collects unneeded items from businesses and individuals, and makes these donations available for free to its recipients: nonprofit organizations with arts programming, government agencies, and public schools.

On any visit, you can expect to find stacks and stacks of useful supplies – bolts of fabric, every kind of paper and card, buckets full of buttons, boxes of feathers, paint, wood, furniture, equipment, and almost anything you can think of.

 

Friends of Materials for the Arts is the nonprofit partner that guides and supports educational programming, warehouse operations, programmatic initiatives and other goals of MFTA. Visit the Friends website to find out more about classes, p-credit courses, and useful resources such as sample lesson plans.

MTFA’s educational programming focuses on creative reuse: making art with readily available materials and the ever-changing MFTA warehouse inventory. The Center hosts programs in two studios, organizes exhibitions of recipient artwork at MFTA Gallery, and sends teaching artists into the community to share the art of reuse. Some examples of programs:

♦ Professional development for teachers workshops help educators learn engaging projects for lessons in all content areas.

♦ Field Trips:  Tour the MFTA warehouse.

♦ In-school residencies: Bring Materials for the Arts to your school or site to enhance and reinforce curricula in math, science, social studies, and language arts.

♦ Art booths and Family Engagement Nights: Creative reuse program or art booth designed for a large audience, or a series of in-class art workshops linked to your curriculum

♦ Public Programs: Exhibitions, open studio nights, and workshops open to the public

♦ Teambuilding Workshops: Volunteer and then work together to create large-scale collaborative art pieces such as quilts, sculptures, or mosaics

There is an application process and applicants need to meet eligibility requirements. Visitors need to make an appointment prior to shopping at the warehouse. Click herefor eligibility and application information.

Materials for the Arts is located at 33-00 Northern Boulevard, 3rd Floor, Long Island City, NY 11101. Click here for hours and directions

For teachers, teaching artists, schools and non-profit arts organizations, the MFTA warehouse is a treasure trove! Enjoy your visit!